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Pacific Alliance

The Pacific Alliance is a trade bloc that aims to become the largest in Latin America. It is composed of four countries: Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. The Alliance was formed following the Lima Declaration, which was signed on 28 April 2011, when Peru’s president at the time, Alan Garcia, took the initiative to invite his counterparts from Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Panama to "deepen the integration between these economies and define joint action for trade ties with Asia Pacific, on the basis of existing bilateral trade agreements between the parties."

The Alliance has held seven summits so far and has as observers Panama (expected to become member in 2013), Costa Rica (also in the process of becoming member) and others.

The Alliance is often criticised together with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which it complements, as an instrument of US interests in Latin America. The vision is that Washington is trying to create a wedge in South America by pushing the countries it already has FTAs with (Colomba, Chile, Peru) to form a bloc and then dragging that bloc into the TPP. Events of the past months show things moving in this direction, to the point that Bolivian President Evo Morales and former Brazilian President Lula da Silva have come out and criticised it.

According to Raul Zibechi: "The Pacific Alliance has three objectives. One: shackle the Pacific countries as exporters of natural goods, consolidate them as countries without industries but huge inequalities and, therefore, rising internal militarisation. Two: prevent the consolidation of regional integration and isolate Brazil as well as Argentina and Venezuela. Three, and its proponents never say this: form the American leg of the TPP which the US wants to convert into an economic arm of its military megaproject to contain China."

last update: September 2013


Pacific Alliance, associate members enter fourth negotiating round, look to clinch deal by July
The four-country Pacific Alliance consists of Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. The coalition aims to achieve the goal, launched nearly a year ago, of conferring a new associate member status to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and Singapore.
Pacific Alliance, associate members advance trade talks, eye new economic opportunities
The talks brought together officials from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and Singapore with the Pacific Alliance coalition made up of four Latin American countries – Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru.
Pacific Alliance looks to Asia as NAFTA, TPP face uncertainty
Pacific Alliance countries are in talks to expand the trade bloc outside Latin America and into high-growth Asia as the future of established deals, such as NAFTA and the evolving Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), hang in the balance.
Bolivian president slams Pacific Alliance trade bloc
Evo Morales says the Pacific Alliance trade bloc is a neocolonial tool intended to cripple regional trade initiatives that exclude the US.
Argentina welcomed as Pacific Alliance observer
Argentina is now an official observer to the Pacific Alliance, the South American bloc that includes Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru as full members.
Colombian Senate endorses FTA with Costa Rica
The Colombian Senate has approved a free trade agreement (FTA) with Costa Rica, a prerequisite for the Central American state to become member of the Pacific Alliance
Mexico and Panama sign free trade agreement
The presidents of Mexico and Panama signed a free trade deal on Thursday, moving the smaller nation a step closer to joining the Pacific Alliance, a regional pact.
Pacific Alliance to eliminate tariffs with new free trade agreement
On February 8-10, the Pacific Alliance holds its eighth summit in Cartagena, Colombia. During the event, the presidents of Chile, Colombia, Peru, and Mexico will sign a free trade agreement to eliminate tariffs on 92 percent of trade goods between the countries. The notable exclusion is agriculture.
Panama, Colombia sign free trade agreement
Panama has signed a free trade agreement with Colombia, making a step forward to join the Pacific Alliance.
Paraguay and the Pacific Alliance: Why the country should not join the regional bloc – analysis
If Paraguay were to enter the Pacific Alliance with its current distribution of land and no progress towards land reform, those who currently hold land—agribusinesses and local elites—will continue to reap the benefits while continuing to displace workers and exacerbating slum conditions in larger cities.

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  • Alianza del Pacífico
    Una iniciativa de integración regional neoliberal conformada por Chile, Colombia, México y Perú